Report low-flying aircraft

There are rules that say how high aircraft can fly. Flying below these heights might be breaking the law. Usually, an aircraft cannot fly lower than 1000 feet over suburban areas (such as cities and towns), or lower than 500 feet over other areas unless they have an exemption to do so.
If you think an aircraft is flying at an unsafe height, report it to the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA):
complain by online form icon

by online form

Report a safety concern

You can report unsafe operations, people or organisations putting aviation safety at risk to CASA.

Issues might include:

  • aerodromes and air traffic control
  • aircraft maintenance
  • aviation training
  • dangerous goods
  • drug and alcohol testing
  • flight crew qualifications and competence
  • medical standards and fitness
  • operating certificates and licences
  • safe operation of aircraft
  • other aviation safety concerns.

Report a matter affecting aviation safety:

complain by online form icon

by online form

Submit a safety reporting form to CASA

complain by phone icon

by phone

Call 131 757 and select the 'safety reporting' option

Report an accident or incident

All accidents and incidents, no matter how minor, must be reported to the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB). They are Australia's independent investigator of civil aviation accidents, incidents and safety issues.

Report an accident or incident:

complain by online form icon

by online form

complain by phone icon

by phone

Call 1800 011 034 toll-free, 24 hours

Submit a confidential report through REPCON

The ATSB also operates a confidential reporting scheme known as REPCON. You can tell the ATSB confidentially about safety concerns with assurance your identity will be protected.

Contact REPCON:

complain by online form icon

by online form

complain by phone icon

by phone

Call 1800 020 505 toll-free

REPCON is not an alternative to complying with mandatory reporting obligations under the Transport Safety Investigation Regulations 2003.